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European Geosciences Union
General Assembly 2008
Vienna, Austria, 13 – 18 April 2008
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Bundesministerium für Wissenschaft und Forschung

International Year of Planet Earth 2007-2009

The Electronic Geophysical Year 2007-2008 International Polar Year 2007-2008

YSOPP Awardees

Award Winners 2007Award Winners 2006Award Winners 2005Award Winners 2004Award Winners 2003

YSOPP Award Winners 2007

YSOPP Award Winners AS

Peter Hjort Lauritzen (pel@ucar.edu)

for the poster entitled:
A Stability Analysis of Finite-Volume Advection Schemes Permitting Long Time Steps
by Lauritzen, P.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Peter is an ASP (Advanced Study Program) postdoc at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. He got his PhD from the University of Copenhagen where he, in collaboration with the Danish Meteorological Institute, derived and implemented a new dynamics module for HIRLAM that exactly conserved mass of air and tracers.

He is particularly interested in numerical methods for dynamical cores, that is (roughly speaking), algorithms that approximate the solution to the adiabatic frictionless equations of motion for the atmosphere on resolved scales. The present poster is about a fundamental part of the dynamical core: advection. It presents the damping and dispersion properties of several widely used advection schemes; among them the so-called Lin & Rood scheme that is used in several European and American general circulation models. It was demonstrated both theoretically and with a conceptual analysis that the scheme is sensitive to the choice of inner and outer operators applied in the scheme that can lead to increased numerical damping for large Courant numbers.
 
YSOPP Award Winners BG

Gwenaёl Imfeld (gwenael.imfeld@ufz.de)

for the poster entitled:
Assessment of in situ degradation of chlorinated ethenes and bacterial community structure in a complex contaminated groundwater system
by Imfeld, G.; Nijenhuis, I.; Zeiger, S.; Nikolausz, M.; Richnow, H.H.; Weber, S.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Gwenaёl is PhD student at the Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig, Germany. His work focuses on the assessement of in situ biodegradation of chlorinated ethenes in complex contaminated groundwater system.
 

Timothy James Benbow (tbenbow@chemistry.otago.ac.nz)

for the poster entitled:
Compound Specific Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation during Solid Phase Extraction
by Benbow, T.J.; Frew, R.D.; Hayman, A.H.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

 
 

Tomasz Ochmański (tomoch@uw.edu.pl)

for the poster entitled:
Microbial mat-related microstructures as proxies of depositional paleoenvironment in open marine clastic settings: case study from Silurian Graptolitic Shales (SGS), central Poland
by Ochmański, T.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Tomasz is a Ph.D. student at the Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Petrology at the Faculty of Geology, Warsaw University. Tomasz present scientific interests are focused on paleoreconstructions of different depositional environments (mostly marine), especially interaction between living organisms and physical/chemical factors influencing fossil record.
 
YSOPP Award Winners CL
Sebastian Kopf (s.kopf@iu-bremen.de)

for the poster entitled:
Using analogues to assess uncertainty in urbanarea climate relocation
by Kopf, S.; HaDuong, M.; Hallegatte, S.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Sebastian is a Bachelor student in Earth and Space Sciences at Jacobs University (formerly International University Bremen), where he will research the impact of siderophores and organic acids on the mobilization of trace and transition elements from igneous and sedimentary rocks for his thesis. His current research in climate change with the Centre International de Recherche sur l'Environnement et le Développement (CIRED) in Paris started as an internship on urban climate relocation, a project that are now expanding to further explore the use of analogues in the visualization of climate change impacts.
 
Björn Machalett (b.machalett@nakula.de)

for the poster entitled:
Dynamics of past aeolian dust deposition in Central Asia: a case study from the loess deposits of southeast Kazakhstan
by Oches, E.A.; Frechen, M.; Zöller, L.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Björn is a PhD fellow of the German Federal Environmental Foundation (DBU), working at the University of Bayreuth and the Leibniz Institute of Applied Geosciences, Hannover. The aim of his research, supervised by Prof. L. Zöller and Prof. M. Frechen, is the deduction of Pleistocene atmospheric circulation patterns by studying the past aeolian dust dynamics that are registered in loess sequences of Eurasia. To characterise these dynamics Björn combines highly resolved particle size studies with different geochronological methods. He put a special focus on amino acid geochronology (AAG), which he is carrying out under the supervision of Prof. E.A. Oches at the University of South Florida AAG laboratory. Björn has pointed out that previous discussed circulation models for Eurasia were too simplified and showed that the past aeolian dust record of Eurasia reflects a long-term signal of seasonality, triggered by changes in duration and permanency of the Asiatic polar front.

 
Didier Swingedouw (didier.swingedouw@cea.fr)

for the poster entitled:
Decrease in the Atlantic overturning does not significantly impact oceanic CO2 uptake over century timescale
by Swingedouw, D.; Bopp, L.; Matras, A.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Didier Swingedouw has completed his PhD at the "Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement" (LSCE) near Paris. He has defended his PhD in November 2006 and is now a European postdoctoral fellow of the NICE project at UCL in Belgium. His research interests are related to the climate dynamics with a multi-disciplinary approach and a focus on the role of the ocean. He has evaluated the origin and the impact of the weakening of the thermohaline circulation under global warming in terms of ocean dynamics, climatic response and oceanic biogeochemical consequences. 
 
YSOPP Award Winners HS
Tomonori Kume (kumett@forest.kyushu-u.ac.jp)

for the poster entitled:
Impacts of soil drought on transpiration in a tropical evergreen forest in northern Thailand
by Kume, T.; Takizawa, H.; Yoshifuji, N.; Tanaka, K.; Tantasirin, C.; Tanaka, N.; Suzuki, M.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Tomonori finished his PhD research on the subject of evapotranspiration in evergreen tropical forests in southeast Asia using sap flow measurements. He now is a Post-Doc at Kasuya Research Forest of Kyushu University, Japan. His main research interest is on the impacts of forest management on water and carbon cycling in various types of forest ecosystem.
 
Christian Schmidt (christian.schmidt@ufz.de)

for the poster entitled:
Quantification of water fluxes at the stream-groundwater interface using mapped streambed temperatures
by Schmidt, C.; Bayer-Raich, M.; Schirmer, M.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Christian is a PhD student at the Department of Hydrogeology of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ in Leipzig, Germany. He is in the last year of his PhD. His research is focused on mapping and quantifying groundwater-surface water exchange using streambed temperatures. Furthermore, he investigates how groundwater discharge to streams influences the fate of organic contaminants at the stream-groundwater interface.
 
YSOPP Award Winners OS
Daria Spivakovskaya (daria@dutita2.twi.tudelft.nl)

for the poster entitled:
Lagrangian modelling of multi-dimensional advection-diffusion with space-varying diffusivities
by Spivakovskaya, D.; Heemink, A.W.; Deleersnijder, E.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Daria Spivakovskaya graduates from Delft University of Technology in September 2007. Her PhD research concerns the Lagrangian modelling of the advection-diffusion processes. She is very grateful to her supervisor Prof. Dr. ir. A.W.Heemink (TU Delft) and Prof. Dr. E.Deleersnijder (UniversitИ catholique de Louvain) for their advices and support.

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YSOPP Award Winners 2006

YSOPP Award Winners AS
Thomas Szegvary (t.szegvary@unibas.ch)

for the poster entitled:
European 222RN flux map for atmospheric tracer applications
by Szegvary, T.; Conen, F.; Leuenberger, M.C.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Thomas is a PhD student at the Institute of Environmental Geosciences at the University of Basel. The aim of his research is to establish a method for better mapping abilities of the 222-Rn flux source term while using a commonly measured proxy, terrestrial gamma dose rate. 222-Rn flux is commonly used as a natural tracer for climate models. To improve such models a detailed source term of the 222-Rn flux is necessary.
 
Andreas P. Weigel (andreas.weigel@meteoswiss.ch)

for the poster entitled:
Bias of ranked probability and Brier skill scores
by Weigel, A.P.; Liniger, M.A.; Appenzeller, C.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Andreas is a postdoc at the Swiss Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology (MeteoSwiss) in Zurich. His research focus is on seasonal climate variability and predictability, probabilistic verification and methods of multi-model combination. Apart from that, he has a strong interest in any aspect of mountain meteorology.
 
YSOPP Award Winners BG
Lewis Dartnell (l.dartnell@ucl.ac.uk)

for the poster entitled:
Life on Mars? Modelling the subsurface radiation environment
by Dartnell, L. R.; Ward, J. M.; Coates, A. J.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Lewis is a PhD student in CoMPLEX (Centre for Mathematics & Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology), University College London. He is looking into the question of whether martian life could be surviving near the surface, in terms of the hazardous flux of radiation from space. This multidisciplinary research is supported by two supervisors, a space physicist and a biochemist. He has firstly written a computer model of various scenarios to calculate likely survival times, and is now moving into lab work to follow-up on these results. Lewis also freelances as a popular science writer, website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/~ucbplrd. The reviewers found the idea of assessing the potential survivability of life in the Martian subsurface outstanding.
 
Marius Müller (mnmueller@ifm-geomar.de)

for the poster entitled:
Cell cycle of Emiliania huxleyi under enhanced atmospheric CO2 and its relation to calcification
by Müller, M.N.; Antia, A. N.; LaRoche, J.; Riebesell, U.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

As PhD student at the Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences (IFM-GEOMAR) Marius is working in the Marine Biogeochemistry department under supervision of Ulf Riebesell. Currently he is involved in the project Casiopeia (founded by the ESF) which focuses on calcium isotope fractionation during biomineralization. His research is concentrated on biogenic calcification in coccolithophores. He has investigated the linkage between calcification of one specific phase in the cell cycle of coccolithophores and the effect of ocean acidification. Now he is studying the influence of the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater and changing environmental conditions on Ca isotope fractionation during calcification. The reviewers appreciated the enthusiasm of Marius and his interest in explaining the project in a clear way. He was very engaged and thoughtful in his response to questions.
 
Andreas Schindlbacher (andreas.schindlbacher@bfw.gv.at)

for the poster entitled:
Experimental soil warming in a mountain forest ecosystem
by Schindlbacher, A.; Jandl, R.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, S.; Glatzel, G.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Andreas is a PhD student at the Institute of Forest Ecology at the University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, BOKU, Austria. His research focuses on the effect of global warming on forest soil carbon turnover. In a warmer world, decomposition processes in soils could be accelerated resulting in a release of stored soil carbon to the atmosphere. He conducted an artificial soil warming experiment in an Austrian mountain forest to evaluate the magnitude of the warming effect on CO2 efflux from soils. The reviewers were impressed with a coherent presentation of a very well focused subject.
 
YSOPP Award Winners HS
Monica Rivas Casado (m.rivas-casado.s03@cranfield.ac.uk)

for the poster entitled:
Guidelines for depth data collection in rivers when applying interpolation techniques (kriging) for river restoration
by Rivas Casado, M.; White, S.; Bellamy, P.; Booker, D.; Dunbar, M.; Maddock, I.; Merwade, V.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Monica is a PhD student at the Institute of Water and Environment at Cranfield University at Silsoe, UK. She is currently on her last year of the PhD seeking for opportunities to continue her research with a post-doctoral position. Her PhD focus on the design of effective an efficient sampling strategies for hydromorphological (i.e. depth, velocity and substrate) data collection in rivers. Geostatistical analysis is being used to adress the research question.
 
Jane Grant (j.grant@abdn.ac.uk)

for the poster entitled:
Groundwater influence in hyporheic zones: a key control on site selection for Atlantic salmon spawning in a braided river system?
by Grant, J.D.; Soulsby, C.; Malcolm, I.A.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Jane is part of the Environmental Hydrology Research Group, in the School of Geosciences at the University of Aberdeen, UK. She is currently in the second year of her PhD which is investigating the effects of groundwater-surface water exchange on the hydroecology of the hyporheic zone of upland rivers. In particular she is interested in how groundwater exchange influences redd site selection by spawning Atlantic salmon in and hyporheic invertebrate community structure.
 
Peter Kienzler (kienzler@ihw.baug.ethz.ch)

for the poster entitled:
Subsurface storm flow - the crucial role of interaction
by Kienzler, P.; Naef, F.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Peter works on his Ph.D. at the Institute of Environmental Engineering at the ETH Zürich, Switzerland. His research focuses on runoff generation mechanisms. In particular, he investigates the formation of subsurface storm flow and how to predict its intensity.
 
YSOPP Award Winners OS
Jérôme Bouffard (bouffard@notos.cst.cnes.fr)

for the poster entitled:
Coastal multi-satellite altimetry data & tide gauge records Techniques, Applications and Validation on two areas
by Bouffard, J.; Maraldi, C.; Ménard, Y; Testut, L.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Jérôme is 25 years old and is currently a Phd student in his 2nd year at LEGOS, Toulouse. His research topics are strongly related to the processing of improved coastal multi-satellite altimetric data and the upgrade of dedicated instrumental and environmental corrections in order to better capture physical coastal processes in the North Western Mediterranean sea. This work emphasizes the potential of this data to observe small scale coastal dynamics and will contribute further to the tuning of altimetry assimilation into coastal 3 D hydrodynamical models.
 
Julie Gatti (gatti@com.univ-mrs.fr)

for the poster entitled:
Modelling the intrusions of the Mediterranean Northern Current on the eastern part of the Gulf of Lion's continental shelf
by Gatti, J.; Petrenko, A.; Leredde, Y.; Devenon, J.L.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Julie has an Engineering Diploma from the Institut des Sciences de l'Ingenieur de Toulon et du Var (ISITV) with a speciality in marine sciences. She has always had a passion and deep interest for oceanographic matters and hence chose to orient her career towards this field. She is now a third year PhD student at the Centre d'Oceanologie de Marseille (COM), in the Laboratoire d'Oceanographie et de Biogeochimie (LOB) under the supervision of Pr. J.-L. Devenon and Dr. A. Petrenko. Her PhD research focuses on studying the intrusions of the Mediterranean Northern Current (NC) on the Gulf of Lion's continental shelf. She has demonstrated the presence of the NC's intrusions on the eastern part of the Gulf with current and hydrological cruise data, and has used numerical modelling to investigate the forcing of these shelf-edge processes.
 
Laure Zanna (zanna@fas.harvard.edu)

for the poster entitled:
Non-normal Amplification of the Thermohaline Circulation
by Zanna, L.; Tziperman, E.; Heimbach, P.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Laure is a Ph.D. student in the department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University. Her thesis focuses on the non-normal dynamics of the thermohaline circulation in present-day climate. More specifically, she combines numerical models and analytical tools in order to investigate how small perturbations could lead to a large transient amplification of the thermohaline circulation due to its non-normal dynamics.

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YSOPP Award Winners 2005

YSOPP Award Winner 2005 (AS)
Ana Aguiar (aguiar@atm.ox.ac.uk)

for the poster entitled:
Instabilities of a barotropic rotating shear layer in a rotating fluid
by Aguiar A.; Read, P.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Ana Aguiar is currently a 2nd year DPhil student at the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Planetary Physics in the University of Oxford, under the supervision of Professor Peter Read. The present work aims to study the response of a detached shear layer to boundary conditions of different topography, combined with either prograde or retrograde mechanical forcings, in a barotropic rotating fluid. Her particular interests are in laboratory experiments and numerical simulation of hydrodynamic instabilities and their applications in geophysical and planetary fluid dynamics.
 
Andrew Vlasenko (neyasit@list.ru)

for the poster entitled:
The role of surface active agents in the processes of heat (mass) transfer in a system ocean-atmosphere
by Vlasenko, A.V.; Lapchin, V.B.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Andrew Vlasenko received his BSc degree in Physical Oceanography at Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University) in 2004. His MSc thesis concerns the problem of ocean-atmosphere interaction with the focus on theoretical and numerical modelling of gravity/capillary convection.
 
Charlotte Stenby (stenby@mpch-mainz.mpg.de)

for the poster entitled:
Ozonolysis of monoterpenes: Temperature dependence of SOA yields
by Stenby, C.; Winterhalter, R.; Nielsen, O. J.; Moortgat, G. K.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Charlotte Stenby is a Ph.D.-student at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Department of Atmospheric Chemistry. He is working with secondary organic aerosols produced by ozonolysis of volatile organic compounds of biogenic origin. The main interest is the influence of the temperature on the formation and growth of the secondary particles.
 
YSOPP Award Winner 2005 (HS)
Matthias Retter (retter@giub.unibe.ch)

for the poster entitled:
Investigating the vectors of subsurface storm flow in a hillslope
by Retter, M.; Hincapié , I.; Germann , P.F.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Matthias works on his Ph.D. in the Soil Science Section of the Institute of Geography at the University of Bern, Switzerland. His research interests focus on runoff generation processes and he is convinced of nowadays need for SLICE.
 
Jon Olav Skøien (skoien@hydro.tuwien.ac.at)

for the poster entitled:
Geostatistical interpolation of runoff
by Skøien, J.O.; Blöschl, G.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Jon Olav works at the Institute for Hydraulic and Water Resources Engineering at Vienna University of Technology (Austria). The main issue of his Ph.D. reserach is how to incorporate scale and network structure in geostatistical hydrologic analyses.
 
Giuliano Di Baldassarre (giuliano.dibaldassarre@mail.ing.unibo.it)

for the poster entitled:
A regional model for estimating the design storm in Northern-Central Italy
by Di Baldassarre, G.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Giuliano works on his Ph.D. at the Department DISTART of the University of Bologna (Italy) under the supervision of Prof. Armando Brath. His research is mainly directed to hydraulic modelling of flood inundations. In particular he has studied the effects of the topographic data resolution on a two-dimensional model accuracy.
 

Anne Fleig (a.k.fleig@geo.uio.no)

for the poster entitled:
A global evaluation of streamflow drought characteristics
by Fleig, A. K.; Tallaksen, L. M.; Hisdal, H.; Demuth, S.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Anne recently started as a Ph.D. student at the Department of Geosciences of the University of Oslo (Norway). Her research is focused on hydrological droughts and their links to regional-scale weather patterns, larger scale atmospheric circulation patterns and low-frequency climate variables in order to develop a statistical forecasting tool for summer droughts in North-Western Europe.
 
YSOPP Award Winners 2005 (OS)
Luis Quaresma (luis.quaresma@hidrografico.pt)

for the poster entitled:
Non-linear internal waves generated at Nazaré canyon: observations over the W Portuguese inner shelf
by Quaresma, L.S.; Vitorino, J.; da Silva, J.C.B.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Luis Quaresma works at the Portuguese Navy Hydrographic Institute, Department of Physical Oceanography. He graduated in Environmental Sciences from University of Évora and the present work is the result of his MSc thesis in Physical Oceanography (Sciences Faculty - University of Lisbon). His main area of interest is related with the internal tide and high frequency non-linear internal wave dynamics, as well as their role in bottom sediment movements and turbulent mixing, with special focus to submarine canyon systems.
 
Luc Rainville (lrainville@whoi.edu)

for the poster entitled:
Propagation of the low-modes internal waves through the ocean
by Rainville, L.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Luc Rainville received his Ph.D from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego in June 2004. In collaboration with his advisor Robert Pinkel, he worked primarily on the propagation of the internal tide from the Hawaiian Ridge, estimating the energy flux of the internal wave spectrum from direct measurements and investigating the factors affecting the propagation of the internal tide. He is now at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, with interests ranging from western boundaries currents and mesoscale circulation to measurements of mixing in the Arctic.

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YSOPP Award Winners 2004

YSOPP Award Winner 2004 (AS)
Johannes Quaas (quaas@dkrz.de)

for the poster entitled:
Evaluation of GCM parameterizations of cloud microphysics and aerosol indirect effects using TOVS satellite data and ground-based remote sensing data of the SIRTA site by Quaas, J.; Stubenrauch, C.; Rädel, G.; Haeffelin, M.; Protat, A.; Boucher, O.; Le Treut, H.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Johannes Quaas recently finished his PhD at Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (CNRS/IPSL) in Paris, France. He is now working at Max-Planck-Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg. His work concerns aerosol indirect effects in global climate models and in satellite data.
 
YSOPP Award Winners 2004 (HS)
Karsten Täumer (karsten.taeumer@tu-berlin.de)

for the poster entitled:
Characteristics of water repellency – seasonal preferential flow occurrence
by Täumer, K.; Stoffregen, H.; Wessolek, G.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Karsten Täumer works in the research group "Interurban" at the Technical University of Berlin (Dept. of Soil Protection) which focuses on turnover processes and water and solute transport on urban sites. Karsten's focus is on the small scale heterogeneities (cm - m) in water transport and soil properties.
 
Philip Brunner (brunner@ihw.baug.ethz.ch)

for the poster entitled:
Generating largescale soil salinity maps with geophysics and remote sensing
by Brunner, P.; Tao Li, H.; Peng Li, W.; Kinzelbach, W.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Philip Brunner works at the Institute of Hydromechanics and Water Resources Management (IHW), Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatics Engineering at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. His Ph.D. project focuses on modelling water and salt fluxes through a agriculturally used basin in Xinjiang, China in order to understand and quantify the process of salination.
 
YSOPP Award Winner 2004 (OS)
Daniel Hayes (dhayes@ucy.ac.cy)

for the poster entitled:
Autonomous underwater vehicle measurements under Antarctic sea ice
by Hayes, D.; Jenkins, A.; McPhail, S.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Daniel Hayes graduated from the University of Washington in Seattle in August 2003. He worked with autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) in the Arctic pack ice with James Morison of the Applied Physics Lab Polar Science Center. They used data collected under sea ice and leads to understand the heat budget of ice-covered ocean. While working at BAS he analyzed data collected with another AUV in the Amundsen Sea. This is the first time the behaviour of gravity waves in pack ice has been observed with an AUV. Now he is in Cyprus at the Oceanographic Center, a collaboration of the University of Cyprus and the Department of Fisheries and Marine Research. He will be working on developing the operational oceanography of the Mediterranean.

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YSOPP Award Winners 2003

YSOPP Award Winners 2003 (HS)

Andreas Bayer (andreas.bayer@iup.uni-heidelberg.de)

for the poster entitled:
Direct measurement of hysteretic water characteristics of porous media using X-ray absorption
by Bayer, A.; Vogel, H.-J.; Roth, K.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Study of the structure of soil columns and the distribution of water in the columns using an x-ray tomography system.
 

Pierre Deschamps (6050@er.uqam.ca)

for the poster entitled:
234U/238U Disequilibria along sedimentary discontinuities in a deep formation: late diagenetic U-relocation processes vs. large scale fluid circulation evidence?
by Deschamps, P.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Michelot, J-L.; Doucelance, R.; Ghaleb, B.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

The doctoral research concerns the migration of naturally occurring radionuclides in deep geological formations, using highly precise and accurate MC-ICP-MS measurement of U-series disequilibria, with the objective of assessing the safety of nuclear waste repository in such formations.
 

Richard Keim (rkeim@lsu.edu)

for the poster entitled:
Stochastic effects of forest canopies on extreme precipitation events and initiation of shallow landslides
by Keim, R. F.; Link, T. E.; Skaugset, A. E.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

The PhD research is focused on quantifying dynamic storage of precipitation in forest canopies, especially how it affects rates of throughfall during extreme precipitation events and attendant initiation of shallow, rapid landslides.
 

Veronique Naudet (naudet@cerege.fr)

for the poster entitled:
Geolectrical methods applied on a contaminated site : the Entressen landfill case study (south-eastern France)
by Naudet, V.; Revil, A.; Bottero, J.-Y.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

In organic contaminated sites, it is possible to get some information about in situ redox potential conditions from electrical potential measurements performed passively at the ground surface (the so-called "self-potential signals"). This electrical signals probably result from electron tranfer through redox fronts and are associated with the presence of biofilms.
 

Arifur Rahman (arifur.rahman@iws.uni-stuttgart.de)

for the poster entitled:
Large scale sandbox experiments on dispersion and mixing
by Rahman, M. A.; Jose, S. C.; Cirpka, O. A.

Click here to download the poster as pdf-file.

Dilution and mixing of solutes in porous media, especially field-scale dilution and mixing of chemicals in the context of studying natural attenuation and natural or accelerated in-situ bioremediation. To Design a quasi two-dimensional tank for the measurement of dilution and mixing by fiber-optic fluorometry in the technical scale.

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